Category Archives: Mobile Services

The Price of Freedompop

Home | Mobile Services | The Price of Freedompop

One of the many famous quotes pertaining to life itself is “Nothing in life is free.” However, we have an up and coming company trying to challenge that phrase by claiming they can and will get you free data for your smartphones and other Wi-Fi using products. This company is Freedompop and they are out to deliver their customers this free data from their services and products. However, another famous phrase of life should come to mind having read those last two sentences. “If it’s too good to be true, then it probably is” has never been more relevant.

I’m not going to be reviewing a product that Freedompop released, rather this Freedompop review will be aimed directly at the company itself. Granted I will be looking at two products they made but only for the sake of relaying information of how the company works. The first of the two products I will examine is the Supernova 655, a 2.95 by 2.95 by 0.52 inches lozenge that has a maximum range of 75 feet, a battery life of almost 6 hours, and a weight of 2.82 ounces. Its portability is top notch, it can support 10 devices at once and it promises free internet, how could such a product not be flying off the shelves and selling like hotcake across the nation? That’s because the internet it provides isn’t free at all, it’s a low cost internet service that offers 1GB per $20. Furthermore, the device has no data monitoring on it at all meaning you won’t know if you’ve gone over your limit.

The other product is Freedompop’s Global 3-in-1 GSM sim kit, a product for smartphones that promises free data like the Supernova 655 does. The sim kit surprisingly does a better job of living up to its promise of free data than the Supernova does, however this requires some extra work in the form of having 10 active friends who all have the sim kit in their phones. In addition, there’s other work to be done ensuring you get your most out of the sim kit. The sim kit and the Supernova share the same directive of charging you $15 whenever you go over your data.

I personally wouldn’t recommend doing business with Freedompop as they have been reported to be very hard to get a hold of and their promises of free internet aren’t entirely true.

Learn more: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.freedompop.ott&hl=en

How Can Poor Communities Benefit From FreedomPop?

Home | Mobile Services | How Can Poor Communities Benefit From FreedomPop?

Everyone who is not in a position to purchase a cell phone might think that they are just stuck without a phone. They might think that there is no way they will ever get a cell phone until they can get back on their feet, but that is not the case anymore. These people can turn to FreedomPop because it is the best company for people who need cheap cell phones.

Everyone in these communities are trying to survive with phones that are too expensive, or they are going to go without a phone because they think that they cannot afford it. They do not want to feel like they cannot get in touch with people, and it is not very safe if these people are going around with phones. FreedomPop is trying to expand to make sure that they cover as much area as possible, and the only way for them to do that is to keep costs low and reach more people. They are going to make it possible for people to have a phone even if they thought they could not get one, and these same people are going to be able to talk and text on a plan that is affordable. They can go for the free plans, and they can get on the plans that allow them to pay a little more when they are using more,

FreedomPop has come up with the only plan that will help people get cell service for less money. It is designed to be as cheap as possible, and it helps people get cheap phones or free phones so they can at least have something to talk on. Anyone can control their budget a lot easier using these services, and then they can hold onto the phones for as long as they need.

Learn more from these reviews:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2427635,00.asp